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in the program. a positive turn in the fiscal cliff crisis. house republicans agree to meet sunday night to resume talks after a day of finger-pointing and complaining in washington. on wall street, fiscal fears created whiplash for investors: a big stock market sell-off and then bounce back on word that lawmakers are springing back into action. and, if you used your smartphone to shop this christmas, you're in fashion. it was the year's top retail trend. we have that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! a dramatic cliff-hanger today between washington and wall street about the fiscal cliff. stocks initially sold off after senate majority leader harry reid predicted the economy would go over the cliff. speaking from the senate floor he said there's not enough time between now and the end of the year to reach a deal. but stocks erased their losses ithe final hour of trading on news that the house of representatives will reconvene on sunday night to resume talks. by the closing bell, the dow was down only 18 points, bouncing back from a triple digit loss, the nasdaq lost four, and the s&p slipped
will wait until tuesday. that means the u.s. could go over the fiscal cliff. on wall street today, investors bought up stocks on high hopes of deal, after president obama said this afternoon a deal is "in sight," and positive comments from republican leaders in the senate. here's how e major averagesr closed on this last trading day of 2012. the dow surged 166 points, the nasdaq jumped about 60, and the s&p rose almost 24 points. while wall street has already closed the books on 2012, washington still has a few hours to go before its new year's day fiscal cliff deadline. darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: after a weekend of late-night negotiations with the vice presidt, senate republican leader mitch mcconnell said an agreement on the fiscal cliff was very, very close. >> we'll continue to work on finding smarter ways to cut spending, but let's not let that hold up protecting americans from the tax hike that will take place in about 10 hours. >> reporter: the deal would raise the top tax rate for individuals making more than $400,000 and couples with more than $450,000 in income. item
to have a fiscal cliff recommendation soon. >> we will be working hard to see if we can get there in next 24 hours and so i am hopeful and optimistic. >> reporter: but the sticking point remains finding something that can make it through the house with enough support from republicans. >> it seems like the 250 threshold that the president proposed previously is unlikely to pass the house in its current form, and so without some sort of additional compromise there, it seems unlikely that we're going to get something done before the end of the year. >> susie: you know thanks for that report. i am just wondering from all of the reporting you have done, do you think we are better off with a bad deal than no deal at all? >> you know susie when peopletal they are talking about a bad deal in political terms. frankly it's republicans that are most worried about the bad deal they have most leverage. the president has the most leverage. they are worried about a bad deal. any deal that gets us past the fiscal cliff is going to be seen as a good deal. >> susie: it seems like we are further apart than
markets again in february. >> the republicans are going to be defeated coming out of this fiscal cliff fight. and i think that they are just not going to go along with raising the debt ceiling unless they get something for it. and if the president is not prepared to give them something, then it's going to be really hard to see a way out of that. >> reporter: if congress does not act before the end of the year, the public's reaction will determine how fast congress moves to fix the damage. >> what forces action after we pass the deadline is the public reaction to it. and so i think the big question is going to be what happens in the real economy, how frustrated are average americans that their paycheck is meaningfully smaller? and if that is a massive reaction, then they'll get a quick response. >> reporter: while u.s. markets have been fairly weak lately, they have not yet registered true alarm at the prospect of deadlock in washington. it seems many investors see the fiscal cliff as a slope that will only gradually impact the economy. but washington analysts believe investors may be u
of the fiscal cliff. if we do go over the cliff, the i.r.s. has warned most taxpayers may not be able to file their returns until late march. that would mean long delays for many tax refunds. and economists warn the economic effects will be felt quickly if $600 billion in automatic tax increases and spending cuts begin to take effect next year. at this rate, it looks like lawmakers will celebrate new year's eve at work-- if not resolving the fiscal cliff, at least trying to avoid the blame. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> susie: going over the fiscal cliff will not only have an impact on the national level, it will also hit states and eventually cities. if lawmakers fail to reach a deal before january 1, the cliff's across the board spending cuts and tax increases will impact how much money states get from the federal government. ruben ramirez reports from washington. >> reporter: we all know the numbers. failing to reach a deal by january 1 will result in $109 billion in automatic cuts to federal spending. and while that's a big number, what matters most to states and municipalities is the
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)